This website uses cookies primarily for visitor analytics. Certain pages will ask you to fill in contact details to receive additional information. On these pages you have the option of having the site log your details for future visits. Indicating you want the site to remember your details will place a cookie on your device. To view our full cookie policy, please click here. You can also view it at any time by going to our Contact Us page.

Researchers score a world first with ‘porous liquid’

12 November 2015

Scientists at Queen’s University Belfast have created a 'porous liquid' with potential for a wide range of new technologies, including carbon capture.

Artist's impression of a 'porous liquid' courtesy of the researchers

Researchers in the School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Queen’s, along with colleagues at the University of Liverpool and other, international partners, have discovered that their new liquid can dissolve unusually large amounts of gas, which are absorbed into the ‘holes’ within it. The results of their research are publishedin the journal, Nature.

The three-year research project could pave the way for many more efficient and greener chemical processes, including carbon capture.

Materials which contain permanent holes, or pores, are technologically important," says Professor Stuart James of Queen’s School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. "They are used for manufacturing a range of products from plastic bottles to petrol. However, until recently, these porous materials have been solids.

"What we have done is to design a special liquid from the ‘bottom-up’ – we designed the shapes of the molecules which make up the liquid so that the liquid could not fill up all the space.

Professor Stuart James

"Because of the empty holes we then had in the liquid, we found that it was able to dissolve unusually large amounts of gas. These first experiments are what is needed to understand this new type of material, and the results point to interesting long-term applications which rely on dissolution of gases.

“A few more years’ research will be needed, but if we can find applications for these porous liquids they could result in new or improved chemical processes. At the very least, we have managed to demonstrate a very new principle – that by creating holes in liquids we can dramatically increase the amount of gas they can dissolve. These remarkable properties suggest interesting applications in the long term.”

Queen’s University Belfast led the research which also involved the University of Liverpool and universities in France, Germany and Argentina. The study was mainly funded by the Leverhulme Trust and the Engineering Physical Science Research Council.


Print this page | E-mail this page