This website uses cookies primarily for visitor analytics. Certain pages will ask you to fill in contact details to receive additional information. On these pages you have the option of having the site log your details for future visits. Indicating you want the site to remember your details will place a cookie on your device. To view our full cookie policy, please click here. You can also view it at any time by going to our Contact Us page.

3D forms of graphene can be 10x stronger than steel

10 January 2017

Researchers at MIT designed one of the strongest, lightweight materials known, by compressing and fusing flakes of graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon.

3D-printed gyroid models such as this one were used to test the strength and mechanical properties of a new lightweight material. (Credit: Melanie Gonick/MIT)

The new material, a sponge-like configuration with a density of just 5 percent, can have a strength 10 times that of steel.

In its two-dimensional form, graphene is thought to be the strongest of all known materials. But researchers until now have had a hard time translating that two-dimensional strength into useful three-dimensional materials.

The new findings show that the crucial aspect of the new 3D forms has more to do with their unusual geometrical configuration than with the material itself, which suggests that similar strong, lightweight materials could be made from a variety of materials by creating similar geometric features.

Previous experiments have failed to produce such results, exhibiting orders of magnitude less strength than expected. The MIT team analysed the materials behaviour down to the level of individual atoms within the structure. This way, the researchers were able to produce a mathematical framework that very closely matches experimental observations. 

The team was able to compress small flakes of graphene using a combination of heat and pressure. This process produced a strong, stable structure whose form resembles that of some corals and microscopic creatures called diatoms. These shapes, which have an enormous surface area in proportion to their volume, proved to be remarkably strong. “Once we created these 3D structures, we wanted to see what’s the limit — what’s the strongest possible material we can produce,” says Zhao Qin, a CEE research scientist. To do that, they created a variety of 3D models and then subjected them to various tests. In computational simulations, which mimic the loading conditions in the tensile and compression tests performed in a tensile loading machine, “one of our samples has 5 percent the density of steel, but 10 times the strength,” Qin says.

What happens to their 3D graphene material, which is composed of curved surfaces under deformation, resembles what would happen with sheets of paper. Paper has little strength along its length and width, and can be easily crumpled up. But when made into certain shapes, for example rolled into a tube, suddenly the strength along the length of the tube is much greater and can support substantial weight. Similarly, the geometric arrangement of the graphene flakes after treatment naturally forms a very strong configuration.

The new configurations have been made in the lab using a high-resolution, multimaterial 3D printer. They were mechanically tested for their tensile and compressive properties, and their mechanical response under loading was simulated using the team’s theoretical models. The results from the experiments and simulations matched accurately.

Many possible applications of the material could eventually be feasible, the researchers say, for uses that require a combination of extreme strength and light weight. 

Video courtesy of Melanie Gonick/MIT.


Print this page | E-mail this page