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World’s first glass-fibre, reinforced polymer bridge

20 March 2017

Launched by Arup and Mabey, this post-tensioned bridge is designed to be assembled in hard to reach sites, quickly and easily.

Pedesta (Credit: Mabey)

The bridge design is part funded by the Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB) as it’s of particular interest to the rail industry as a safer alternative to level crossings where traditional pedestrian bridges cannot be fitted.

Mabey has become the first licensed distribution partner, launching the bridge under the name Pedesta. Pre-engineered, modular, and fully customisable in its form, material, colour and finish, the Pedesta features identical modules, 1m in length, which are fixed together with bolted shear connectors and then post-tensioned. The system allows spans of up to 30m, so it can adapt to suit any application. In addition, being 70 percent lighter than steel, the modules only require a pallet truck or forklift to move, enabling faster, safer and more efficient project delivery. The material provides additional resistance to fire, graffiti, vandalism, and ultra-violet radiation.

Rebecca Stewart, Associate, Arup said “we are focused on engineering solutions to make bridges more resilient and simpler to construct. This modular bridge is quick and easy to install, minimises disruption to the surrounding communities and significantly reduces ongoing maintenance costs. We can see this bridge being useful for a whole host of global applications – from rail footbridges to road and river spans. It is great to have partnered with Mabey and for them to have become our first licensed partner.”

The first bridge has already been installed at a Site of Special Scientific Interest for Network Rail in Oxford. 


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