This website uses cookies primarily for visitor analytics. Certain pages will ask you to fill in contact details to receive additional information. On these pages you have the option of having the site log your details for future visits. Indicating you want the site to remember your details will place a cookie on your device. To view our full cookie policy, please click here. You can also view it at any time by going to our Contact Us page.

More than 620,000 UK manufacturing jobs lost since financial crash

11 November 2019

The UK has lost more than 620,000 manufacturing jobs since the financial crash, new analysis by GMB has shown.

Shutterstock image

The figures, discussed at GMB’s Manufacturing Conference in Belfast, show that 621,600 jobs in the sector disappeared between 2007 and 2019, a massive fall of 17%.

In 2007, the UK supported 3.5 million permanent and temporary manufacturing jobs, but by 2019 that figure had slumped to 2.9 million.

GMB says the slump has been worsened by Conservative Government’s lack of industrial strategy and failure to invest in UK jobs is costing a generation of workers their futures.

The union is campaigning for procurement decisions to take account of tax and spending in the UK, as well as subsides paid to non-UK competitors.

Jude Brimble, GMB National Secretary, said: “It’s a scandal the Conservatives are willing to gamble away manufacturing’s future.

“Under their watch, vital contracts are being sent overseas at the expense of industries including shipbuilding and renewables manufacturing.

“The absence of any kind of industrial strategy, coupled with a complete lack of investment is robbing a whole generation of their futures.

“This has not happened by chance. There are thousands of jobs that could be created in sustainable energy and renewables, but this government have failed to invest and let our contracts go overseas.

“Labour are promising a Green Industrial Revolution that creates the jobs our manufacturing industry that communities are crying out for.”


Print this page | E-mail this page