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Condition monitoring evolution drives machine performance and reliability improvements

Author : Phil Burge, PR and Brand Awareness Manager at SKF

01 May 2020

With more advanced condition monitoring technology at their disposal, today’s maintenance and operations teams can spend less time collecting data and more time acting on it. Phil Burge, PR and Brand Awareness Manager at SKF, charts progress in this economically crucial area of industrial improvement.

In most manufacturing and processing operations, the approach to plant asset management moved long ago from reactive to preventative maintenance. Instead of carrying out repairs in the aftermath of machine failure, regular checks and interventions are now scheduled. Based on asset condition monitoring, the success of predictive maintenance has been its use of insights – gained from the collection and analysis of machine data – to improve plant operations and reduce unplanned stoppages. 

Intuitive to automated monitoring

While technicians previously depended largely on human senses to detect changes in temperature, vibration, lubricant condition, and other operating parameters, much greater sensitivity and accuracy are now possible. This is largely thanks to purpose-developed, hand-held measuring instruments. These are applied manually during routine walk-through inspections. For more sophisticated and time-saving monitoring, sensors can be permanently installed on the machinery to gather data automatically and transmit it across a network.

Read the full article in the May issue of DPA



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