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IP firm launches fund to help turn bright ideas into commercial success

14 May 2012

North of England based Patent and trademark attorneys, Appleyard Lees has launched a £50,000 growth fund to help companies protect and nurture their innovative ideas and inventions. Grants from the Appleyard Lees Growth Fund will be awarded on a case by case basis to companies with winning ideas, a track record for innovation and a sound strategic approach.

Ean Davies

Recognised as a significant commercial asset, IP is crucial to business innovation and growth but many companies find themselves in the dark when it comes to protecting their assets. Ean Davies (pictured), partner at Appleyard Lees says that in a challenging economic climate organisations might be tempted to take short cuts or simply not safeguard their bright ideas, especially if they don’t realise how critical IP is to commercial growth. "We want to support SMEs in their innovation strategies and advise them on how they can protect ideas and inventions, to achieve sustained growth,” he says.

Organisations sometimes fail to recognise the value of IP – that it can be sold, licenced for royalties or used as security against bank loans, as well as simply blocking competitors from using their innovations. Appleyard Lees says it aims to educate and inform businesses on how they can benefit from the firm’s technical and legal expertise.

Partners at the firm of IP specialists will examine each case and will award grants on the basis of viability, against its criteria for eligibility.

For more information about the Growth Fund click here.


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