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International Space Apps registrations to open soon

04 March 2013

On April 21 and 22, teams around the UK will be participating in the International Space Apps Challenge to find innovative uses for satellite data in solving everyday problems.

Events are being held at the Google campus in London, at York University, Strathclyde University, Leicester University, and in the Met Office, Exeter. Software programmers and developers; satellite engineers and data users; students and enthusiasts are encouraged to come along for the weekend to help create open solutions with space data.

An initiative of NASA’s Open Government Partnership, the International Space Apps Challenge will showcase the impact that people working together around the world can have on addressing challenges, both on earth and in space, by using open government data resulting from space technology.

The technology and use of satellite data is a major part of the UK space sector, and we’re leading the world in developing applications and services. Helping to lead the way, the Met Office, Satellite Applications Catapult and UK Space Agency are promoting the events and building useful UK-focused challenges.

Events are planned in cities around the globe and encompass far more than just the development of mobile apps. The event will focus on four challenge areas—software, open hardware, citizen science and data visualisation—providing a platform for open innovation and collaborative problem solving.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Challenge, find out more about sites in the UK and to register your interest, click here.


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