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Internet pioneers win the inaugural Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

18 March 2013

Five engineers who created the Internet and the World Wide Web have together won the inaugural £1 million Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering for their innovations.

Robert Kahn, a member of the award wining team at the presentation which took place this afternoon at the Royal Academy of Engineering

Today a third of the world’s population use the Internet and it is estimated to carry around 330 Petabytes of data per year, enough to transfer every character ever written in every book ever published 20 times over.

The winners are Robert Kahn, Vinton Cerf and Louis Pouzin for their contributions to the protocols that make up the fundamental architecture of the Internet, Tim Berners-Lee who created the World Wide Web and Marc Andreessen who wrote the Mosaic browser.

The announcement was made by Lord Browne of Madingley in the presence of HRH The Princess Royal at the Royal Academy of Engineering on 18 March 2013. The winners will come to London in June for the formal presentation of the prize by Her Majesty The Queen.


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