This website uses cookies primarily for visitor analytics. Certain pages will ask you to fill in contact details to receive additional information. On these pages you have the option of having the site log your details for future visits. Indicating you want the site to remember your details will place a cookie on your device. To view our full cookie policy, please click here. You can also view it at any time by going to our Contact Us page.

Drug delivery: small packages bring big results

14 July 2013

Researchers have developed an efficient system to coat tiny objects, such as bacterial cells, with thin films that assemble themselves.

Image courtesy of the University of Melbourne

The technique could have important implications for drug delivery as well as biomedical and environmental applications.

Published July 12 in the journal Science, Professor Frank Caruso from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The University of Melbourne and his team have developed a new strategy to coat microscopic materials, leading to a new-generation particle system with engineered properties.

This is expected to underpin advances in the delivery of therapeutics in the areas of cancer, vaccines, cardiovascular disease and neural health.

The capsules can be engineered to degrade under different conditions, providing opportunities for the timed release of substances contained inside the capsules.

"Nanoengineered capsules are attracting much attention as drug carriers, as they have the potential to improve the delivery and effectiveness of drugs while reducing their side effects," he said


Print this page | E-mail this page