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UK anti-bacteria lighting technology to be manufactured in USA under licence

27 June 2015

The first hospital light fixture able to kill bacteria is to be manufactured by Kenall Manufacturing under an exclusive licensing agreement with the University of Strathclyde.

Microbial contamination on a contact agar plate with a 405nm light source in the background

Kenall Manufacturing's Indigo-Clean is a light fixture that uses Continuous Environmental Disinfection technology to continuously kill harmful bacteria linked to hospital acquired infections. The technology behind Indigo-Clean inactivates a wide range of micro-organisms, including MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), C.difficile and VRE (Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus).

The light fixture will be manufactured under an exclusive licensing agreement with the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, which developed, proved and patented the technology. The light operates continuously and requires no operator, kills bacteria in the air and on all surfaces, and complies with all internationally recognised standards for patient safety

Indigo-Clean uses a narrow spectrum of visible light in the 405nm wavelength range. This high-intensity narrow spectrum light is absorbed by molecules within bacteria, producing a chemical reaction that kills the bacteria from the inside as if common household bleach had been released within the bacterial cells. The visible light is safe for use in the presence of patients and staff.

Strathclyde gained a US patent on the technology last year and recently granted Kenall licensing rights for the North American healthcare market.


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