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Reliable sensors in harsh, demanding vehicle road tests and dynamometers

Author : Glenn Wedgbrow, Micro-Epsilon UK

30 June 2022

Glenn Wedgbrow, Business Development Manager at Micro-Epsilon UK, discusses some of the more challenging automotive test applications for non-contact displacement measurement, draw-wire and infrared temperature sensors.

As the development of next-generation vehicles continues apace, the ride of a vehicle and the associated noise that it makes become increasingly important. Without the normal engine noise to hide the sound, the squeal of brakes, squeaks of suspension and movement of pedals all suddenly become more apparent – even though they have probably always been there.

Manufacturers increasingly need to understand the movements and behaviour of key components and structures as part of the NVH testing. It’s important that the instrumentation used to provide feedback doesn’t itself affect the NVH results. 

Vehicle ride height
In automotive and motorsport applications, measuring vehicle ride height is critical. As speeds increase, the stability of the car and the aerodynamics employed must be carefully monitored to ensure the car stays on the ground. Non-contact laser displacement sensors have been developed to withstand the shock and vibration of being mounted to a vehicle. With the laser window pointing down towards the ground or racing track,

Micro-Epsilon’s ILD1420 sensor series has been used extensively across all motorsport classes to measure and monitor accurately the ride height of their cars as they travel around the test track...



Read the full article in DPA's July issue




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